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todaysdocument:

Nice use of our Mathew Brady photographs series with this animated Abe Lincoln GIF! (And with a proper source link too!)

retrocampaigns:
… yeah, I don’t really know why I made this, either.
Via the Brady National Photographic Art Gallery / National Archives


Inspired to make your own #HistoryGIF? Let us know if you create something similar with National Archives holdings - just tag us (todaysdocument) or submit it!

todaysdocument:

Nice use of our Mathew Brady photographs series with this animated Abe Lincoln GIF! (And with a proper source link too!)

retrocampaigns:

… yeah, I don’t really know why I made this, either.

Via the Brady National Photographic Art Gallery / National Archives

Inspired to make your own #HistoryGIF? Let us know if you create something similar with National Archives holdings - just tag us (todaysdocument) or submit it!

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr. is Assassinated
On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was fatally shot while standing on the balcony outside his second-story motel room in Memphis, TN.
Revisit the life and legacy of Dr. King with a special collection from PBS.
A collection of original posters created for The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross PBS series features quotations by famous African Americans, including leaders, intellectuals and cultural figures. The posters, which can be downloaded, printed and shared, can be found here: http://to.pbs.org/1efp1fy

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr. is Assassinated

On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was fatally shot while standing on the balcony outside his second-story motel room in Memphis, TN.

Revisit the life and legacy of Dr. King with a special collection from PBS.

A collection of original posters created for The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross PBS series features quotations by famous African Americans, including leaders, intellectuals and cultural figures. The posters, which can be downloaded, printed and shared, can be found here: http://to.pbs.org/1efp1fy

*17
vintascope:

Upjohn - 19450512 Post on Flickr.

A vintage Upjohn ad I ran across today.

vintascope:

Upjohn - 19450512 Post on Flickr.

A vintage Upjohn ad I ran across today.

*46
alplm:

Abraham and Mary Lincoln Marriage License, November 4, 1842
After courting for two years Lincoln and Mary reached an understanding they would marry, much to the dismay of her family.   But as familial opposition mounted, Lincoln began to wonder if his decision was the right one.  He did not doubt his love for Mary, but questioned whether he could provide for her emotional needs as well as her physical comfort, after all, Mary had been raised a pampered daughter in a Kentucky blueblood family.  A story handed down through Edwards’ family history tells of a fight that took place between Mary and Lincoln that led to their estrangement.  Mary and Lincoln were invited to a New Year’s Eve party and he was supposed to escort her, but Lincoln was late and Mary became upset.   Rather than wait for him, she left without him.  When Lincoln finally arrived at the party, he saw Mary dancing and flirting outrageously.  Both became angry with the other and as a result, Lincoln unhappily released Mary from her promise, and for eighteen months they had no contact with each other.  Both Lincoln and Mary suffered during this time.  Lincoln described himself as the “most miserable man on earth” causing his friends great worry over his mental health.  Later, Lincoln wrote that he could not be happy while Mary was miserable.  That thought “kills my soul,” he wrote his friend, Joshua Speed. Mary too was affected by the break-up; she changed from a fun-loving, flirtatious girl to a quiet and more thoughtful woman.
While Mary’s family were glad of her break from Lincoln, several friendswere eager to reunite the young couple. For several months Mary and Lincoln secretly met and resumed their romance.  Mary announced her plan to marry Lincoln to her stunned sister on the morning of November 4, 1842.  That very evening, they were married in the home of her guardians, Elizabeth and Ninian Edwards.  Mary’s family, rather than risk scandal, had finally relented.  Originally, the young couple intended to quietly marry at the home of Charles Dresser, an Episcopal minister, but Elizabeth, confronted with the inevitability of Mary’s decision, offered to host the wedding and supper at her home.
Mary flouted convention by her last minute decision to wed.  Etiquette books suggested at least one week’s notice be given prior to marrying.  The wedding was a small affair, an estimated thirty guests attended. Because it was on such short notice, Mary did not have time to pick out a special wedding gown and instead wore a dress borrowed from her sister.  Neither Mary’s father nor stepmother attended the ceremony.  In spite of the hasty arrangements one guest wrote, “The entertainment was simple but in beautiful taste.” Weddings in the nineteenth century were not the grand, excessive ceremonies that couples indulge in today.  Typically, the small gathering of family and close friends was held in the bride’s home.  Most brides-to-be began assembling a trousseau as they prepared for marriage.  This included household furnishings, textiles, and sometimes money.  Even though the exchanging of rings and the giving of gifts was uncommon, Lincoln somehow found time to have Mary’s ring engraved with the words, “Love is Eternal.”

I’d never heard the story about the Lincolns in quite this way.

alplm:

Abraham and Mary Lincoln Marriage License, November 4, 1842

After courting for two years Lincoln and Mary reached an understanding they would marry, much to the dismay of her family.   But as familial opposition mounted, Lincoln began to wonder if his decision was the right one.  He did not doubt his love for Mary, but questioned whether he could provide for her emotional needs as well as her physical comfort, after all, Mary had been raised a pampered daughter in a Kentucky blueblood family.  A story handed down through Edwards’ family history tells of a fight that took place between Mary and Lincoln that led to their estrangement.  Mary and Lincoln were invited to a New Year’s Eve party and he was supposed to escort her, but Lincoln was late and Mary became upset.   Rather than wait for him, she left without him.  When Lincoln finally arrived at the party, he saw Mary dancing and flirting outrageously.  Both became angry with the other and as a result, Lincoln unhappily released Mary from her promise, and for eighteen months they had no contact with each other.  Both Lincoln and Mary suffered during this time.  Lincoln described himself as the “most miserable man on earth” causing his friends great worry over his mental health.  Later, Lincoln wrote that he could not be happy while Mary was miserable.  That thought “kills my soul,” he wrote his friend, Joshua Speed. Mary too was affected by the break-up; she changed from a fun-loving, flirtatious girl to a quiet and more thoughtful woman.

While Mary’s family were glad of her break from Lincoln, several friendswere eager to reunite the young couple. For several months Mary and Lincoln secretly met and resumed their romance.  Mary announced her plan to marry Lincoln to her stunned sister on the morning of November 4, 1842.  That very evening, they were married in the home of her guardians, Elizabeth and Ninian Edwards.  Mary’s family, rather than risk scandal, had finally relented.  Originally, the young couple intended to quietly marry at the home of Charles Dresser, an Episcopal minister, but Elizabeth, confronted with the inevitability of Mary’s decision, offered to host the wedding and supper at her home.

Mary flouted convention by her last minute decision to wed.  Etiquette books suggested at least one week’s notice be given prior to marrying.  The wedding was a small affair, an estimated thirty guests attended. Because it was on such short notice, Mary did not have time to pick out a special wedding gown and instead wore a dress borrowed from her sister.  Neither Mary’s father nor stepmother attended the ceremony.  In spite of the hasty arrangements one guest wrote, “The entertainment was simple but in beautiful taste.” Weddings in the nineteenth century were not the grand, excessive ceremonies that couples indulge in today.  Typically, the small gathering of family and close friends was held in the bride’s home.  Most brides-to-be began assembling a trousseau as they prepared for marriage.  This included household furnishings, textiles, and sometimes money.  Even though the exchanging of rings and the giving of gifts was uncommon, Lincoln somehow found time to have Mary’s ring engraved with the words, “Love is Eternal.”



I’d never heard the story about the Lincolns in quite this way.

(via retrocampaigns)

*14
tinytimetravel:

"Carnation Day", from the Washington [D.C.] "Times", 1/29/1914 [p.9]. 25th President of the United States, William McKinley, was born this day in 1843. It’s difficult to imagine a similar set of circumstances today, but from 1865 to 1901, a span of merely 36 years, three U.S. Presidents were murdered by assassins. It’s difficult to tell, though, whether ordinary people really did remember the slain "martyred" 25th President, or if the florists of Washington merely wanted to capitalize on his murder by selling more carnations. Since this mention of "Carnation Day" occurs deep in the newspaper, and the holiday, if such it was, was apparently not officially marked, it seems likely that McKinley was already slipping down the memory hole, to be mostly forgotten outside of historians and political junkies.

tinytimetravel:

"Carnation Day", from the Washington [D.C.] "Times", 1/29/1914 [p.9]. 25th President of the United States, William McKinley, was born this day in 1843. It’s difficult to imagine a similar set of circumstances today, but from 1865 to 1901, a span of merely 36 years, three U.S. Presidents were murdered by assassins. It’s difficult to tell, though, whether ordinary people really did remember the slain "martyred" 25th President, or if the florists of Washington merely wanted to capitalize on his murder by selling more carnations. Since this mention of "Carnation Day" occurs deep in the newspaper, and the holiday, if such it was, was apparently not officially marked, it seems likely that McKinley was already slipping down the memory hole, to be mostly forgotten outside of historians and political junkies.

(via retrocampaigns)

*65
doodlepark:

Known

Not a primary source, but don’t we all need a little history hilarity about now? I thought so.

doodlepark:

Known

Not a primary source, but don’t we all need a little history hilarity about now? I thought so.

(via retrocampaigns)

karenhallion:

juliedillon:

sicosa:

WHAT 

WAHT

WAT

GLORIOUS

This is amazing. I need this.

(Source: twinkhorse, via edwardspoonhands)

The Day the Music Died: 55 Years Ago, February 3, 1959.

This is the Civil Aeronautics Board’s Accident Report of Buddy Holly’s deadly plane crash in Iowa on February 3, 1959.  It includes details of the weather, a map of the location and a description of what the “entertainers” were doing in Iowa.  On page two, we see the name of Buddy Holly as “Charles Hardin” and the other musicians — “The Big Bopper” (J.P. Richardson), and Ritchie Valens (Richard Valenzuela), who were traveling with him.

You can take a look at the entire 13 pages of the report here: Aircraft Accident Report , 02/03/1959.

Today’s the day that “American Pie” song was written about. “The Day the Music Died”.

(via todaysdocument)

fordlibrarymuseum:

Strong Voices, Strong Women

Entertainers Carol Burnett and Helen Reddy serenaded guests with a medley of songs of the Sixties at a state dinner honoring Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin of Israel on January 27, 1976.

Then starring in the ninth season of her Emmy-winning variety program “The Carol Burnett Show,” Burnett was also known for her roles in musicals. Reddy, one of country’s leading recording artists, had achieved success on the popular music charts after moving to the United States from Australia in 1966.

They followed the medley with a rendition of Reddy’s hit song “I am Woman” dedicated to Mrs. Ford and Mrs. Rabin.

This is so awesome.

(via todaysdocument)

fishingboatproceeds:

Congratulations to the 2014 Printz Award winners!!!!! (For those who don’t know, the Printz Award is like the Oscars of YA literature.)
Whenever anyone tells you that YA books lack quality or diversity, read some Printz winners. They show that YA fiction is broad and deep and wonderful. 
(Image source.)

fishingboatproceeds:

Congratulations to the 2014 Printz Award winners!!!!! (For those who don’t know, the Printz Award is like the Oscars of YA literature.)

Whenever anyone tells you that YA books lack quality or diversity, read some Printz winners. They show that YA fiction is broad and deep and wonderful. 

(Image source.)